Baha'i CRIC project

Christine and Norma Bluebaugh help clean out the Cache Refugee and Immigrant Connection community garden on Saturday afternoon as part of the local Baha’i celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Bab, the prophet founder of the Baha’i faith.

Local members of the Baha’i faith gathered on Saturday to help prepare the Cache Refugee and Immigrant Connection community garden in Logan for winter.

“Without large groups, it (maintaining the garden space) wouldn’t get done,” said Crista Sorenson, the center’s garden coordinator.

Thanks to funding from Utah State University Extension, this is the first year the center has had an official garden coordinator, Sorenson said. Because of this, she said it is also the first year the garden will be properly “put to bed.”

“That means in the spring you can have your plan and be ready to go,” Sorenson said. “A lot of the refugee population that utilizes this space come from climates that have a yearlong growing season versus a 90-day season. So any sort of jump on next year that we can get is amazing.”

Saturday’s event was organized by both the Logan Baha’i Community and the USU Interfaith Student Association as a celebration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Bab, the prophet founder of the Baha’i faith.

Baha’i began in the late 1800s in the Middle East and teaches the worth of all religious traditions. The Baha’i calendar has multiple feast and holy days, including the anniversary of the Bab’s birth.

A longtime member of the Baha’i faith, Barbra Elchmar said participating in this service project was important to her because of how it fits with the faith’s message of the oneness of mankind.

“Our world is so disunified today,” Elchmar said. “There’s so much conflict and contention. I love doing anything that raises awareness of the nature of our connection with one another.”

Andy Keller is another member of the local Baha’i community who attended Saturday’s event and said there is something special about gardens and being outside touching the earth.

“When you can do that and you can do it as a service project, in the name of something that is very spiritually significant to you,” Keller said, “that’s a special opportunity.”

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